Aestetic Plasma Pen Treatments

Plasma Pen Treatment

In nature, there are four states of matter – solids, liquids, gases, and plasma. Matter only becomes a plasma when enough energy is delivered to split the atoms into electrons and the output of this is a ‘plasma cloud’ of charged particles which consist of free radicals, positively charged ions, and negatively charged electrons and molecules.

Our device creates an electrical discharge between two electrodes which are separated by an ‘insulating dielectric barrier’.  As the charge collects on the surface of our dielectric barrier, it discharges as a flash of plasma within millionths of a second. An intelligent combination of the design of our device and its continuous direct energy source ionizes the nitrogen and oxygen in the air to create a plasma gas which is then both sustained and continuous in line with the unique fingertip control and on-demand nature of our Plasma Pen device. Although we are creating collisions between molecules and causing the emission of energetic photons, the energy required to do this is actually minimal so our device is (and only needs to be) low-voltage. The plasma we create with our device transfers to the skin with absolute precision and does not harm any of the surrounding tissue.

The first and most immediate effect is delivered to the outer layer of the epidermis where we create external micro-trauma which helps immediately contract and tighten the skin. The next major effect is that the plasma simultaneously penetrates down into the fibroblasts which are contained deeper within the dermis below and, in doing so, we stimulate accelerated fibroblast division and migration, as well as encouraging neovascularisation – the natural formation of new blood vessels and the release of growth factors. These growth factors include fibroblast growth factors, platelet-derived endothelial growth factors, and cytokines. Cytokines are small proteins that are very important in cell signaling and which affect the behavior of cells around them. They help modulate our immune response, they regulate cell maturation (aging) and quarterback the growth of new cells. They are particularly important in directing our body’s response to the inflammation trauma that we cause because they stimulate both cell repair and new cell reproduction.

The inflammatory response which occurs during the healing process that we promote also activates what is known as “M2 Macrophages”.  Macrophages are white blood cells that engulf and digest cellular debris, foreign substances, microbes, cancer cells, and indeed anything else without proteins that are good for healthy cells. M2 macrophages decrease the inflammation we cause and encourage tissue regeneration and repair. We also stimulate the migration of basal keratinocytes up to the surface of the skin. Wounds to the skin are repaired, in part, by the migration of keratinocytes from the basal layer of the skin which then fill in the gaps created by the micro-wounds we create. Within the healed epidermis they are, in turn, replaced by keratinocytes that originate from the epidermis.